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beefybake
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PostSubject: Tool recommendations   Thu Jun 27, 2013 8:30 pm

I have a philosophy that I buy the best I can afford, that doesn't always mean the most expensive as sometimes you just pay for the name.
I also believe in having the right tool for the job.

To get the best price I tend to shop online but the problem being, you can't sample the goods before you buy, so to the point of this thread,

Oily handed people of Bangernomics please name and shame tools you've bought, good or bad so that others can get the best for their money.



To start you off,

Draper soldering iron from halfords melted its own tip so I wouldn't recommend that.

Dura tool ratchet crimping tool works great.
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MilfordHaven
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PostSubject: Re: Tool recommendations   Thu Jun 27, 2013 8:37 pm

I used to buy what I can afford would not touch draper with a barge pole as have injured myself with their tools when they have broken. I think a lot of the Bergen stuff is great not mac tool or snap on prices but just as good I find but their grinding discs are something to be desired. But I have found cutting discs being hit and miss some out of the same pack are good and some just disintegrate. Us pro tools seem good too Siegen are good
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TechSupport
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PostSubject: Re: Tool recommendations   Thu Jun 27, 2013 9:00 pm

Draper don't make tools, they're an importer who get their name put on all manner of stuff from cheap-as-chips pound-shop quality, right up to top quality professional gear. Clarke, Sealey, Laser, Halfords and many others do the same.

Elora, Gedore, Beta, Facom, Britool, King-Dick, and Norbar all make their own stuff.

It's useless to say that an Elora spanner is better than a King-Dick one, or that both are better than a Halfords Pro. A lot of it comes down to personal choice and "feel", as well as brand loyalty. You do get what you pay for though, as a rule, with cheap stuff being cheap for a reason. The exception is anything touted by the mobile van salesmen straight to the garages; they're almost exclusively dear because you're paying both for the convenience of not leaving work to buy a spanner (why take an hour to save a fiver on a spanner when you can earn 50 in that same hour?) and the fact that credit facilities are available which are often defaulted on but still need paying for. Snap-On are particularly guilty of this, hiking their ticket prices to cover their garantee/warranty/defaulted credit costs.

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Ant
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PostSubject: Re: Tool recommendations   Thu Jun 27, 2013 10:11 pm

Buy 2nd hand tools! The better the name the longer they last! Will also clean up so won't look old and 'cheap'..

I only have halfords pro sets ATM and my facom bits as my late dads tools I inherited (snap on , us pro and britool to name a few) was stolen 3 years back! Ooops!
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Wrench
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PostSubject: Re: Tool recommendations   Fri Jun 28, 2013 2:27 pm

I have given up buying sets of tools. I have a 50 piece Halfords socket set and 60% of it has never been used. Now I just buy single items when I need one.
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Joloke
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PostSubject: Re: Tool recommendations   Fri Jun 28, 2013 5:06 pm

Wrench wrote:
I have given up buying sets of tools. I have a 50 piece Halfords socket set and 60% of it has never been used. Now I just buy single items when I need one.

My socket were not even bought they were abandoned at my parents house years and years ago?

The reason they were discarded was a broken ratchet handle so I went out and bought some good quality Stanley brand handles :Wky:

I needed a sump plug socket when I had my classic mini but wasn't prepared to pay the price for one socket so found a rusty one in the bottom of a box at a Mini Show,asked how much?

50 pence cheers

Ok so I had to soak it to dissolve the rust but once cleaned off it did me fine still got it now Thumb

Car shows and auto jumbles are a great source for buying quality old tools if your not sure what you haven't got just take a list with you and if there's any size sockets you don't already have as long as they are cheap enough just buy them :Wky:

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Wrench
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PostSubject: Re: Tool recommendations   Fri Jun 28, 2013 5:13 pm

Whilst Halfords stuff appears to be good run of the mill tools, in general Halfords is way too expensive unless they have offers and then it only brings them down to the level that you can buy branded items with careful shopping around. The branded items are usually better as well.
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edlithgow
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PostSubject: Re: Tool recommendations   Sat Jun 29, 2013 9:47 am

Buying "the best" is satisfying, but (in the UK at least) there is a significant snag, mentioned above.

They get knicked.

Not long before leaving for the UK I had my toobox (mostly Hilka, which were good when I bought them, some Britool, Sykes-Pickavant and Halfords Pro) swiped from my broken-into car, and its happened before. As an apartment dweller forced to work in the street this is an unavoidable hazard, and I came to the conclusion that it unfortunately contra-indicated the best tools.

In Taiwan that risk is very much lower, but if I have to return to the UK I'd probably have to leave tools behind, so I've gone fairly cheap unknown (to me) stuff (AKRO, Black Hand) probably Chinese but they might be Taiwanese, and some Stanley which are probably Chinese and seem to have the worst price/quality ratio but have very shiny chrome.

Slightly to my surprise, they've been OK. I've broken some screwdriver T-handles and that's it. I've always got the option to buy a one-off "best" item if I come across an especially tough nut (provided I don't smash my knuckles finding out, of course).

Thats different from sourcing all your tools "as needed" (as recommended above) which would ensure that, for an extended time, you are guaranteed to never have the right spanner.

In the abscence of autojumbles/used tools etc, which aren't available here, it'd also be much more expensive than buying sets.

It could be that corrosion is less of a problem here. My car was unusually rusty, but I gave it a good spray down with diesel/oil when I bought it, which might have helped.

The exception is motorcycles, which I hadn't really worked on in the UK, and which are chronically afflicted by crappy little cross-head screws that get welded into alloy engine casings with corrosion.

I eventually stumped up for the most expensive allegedly Japanese impact driver I could find, (Ko-ken "Attack Driver" - Tora! Tora!, and Banzai!) and discovered that (contrary to what Draper had taught me) impact drivers can actually work.

Good tools are just...nice, unfortunately.
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edlithgow
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PostSubject: Re: Tool recommendations   Sun Jun 30, 2013 4:21 am

There's a Japanese company called Daiso with stores in Taiwan, essentially a Japanese "Pound Shop" (everything 39NT, which is about 85 pence).

I'd hesitate to buy tools from a UK Pound Shop, and it took me a while to bring myself to buy these, but they seem to be fairly OK. Wish I'd started sooner.

Only small stuff of course (ring/open-ended spanners, pliers, srewdrivers) and the range seems to have shrunk lately, probably due to the price ceiling.

Dunno if they have outlets in the UK, but if you get a chance, check them out.
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