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 Oily Rag Restoration Principle?

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stereosound
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PostSubject: Oily Rag Restoration Principle?   Fri Mar 29, 2013 9:30 am

A couple of months ago a Great new car restoration series started on National Geographic Channel called "Car SOS" :Wky:

It is hosted by Fuzz Townsend from Practical Classics Mag and Tim Shaw (ex 5th gear)

Last night they restored a vintage Austin Light 12 to what they referred to as the "Oily Rag Restoration" way of thinking :W:

I had never heard of this before but apparently the guy whose car they were restoring didn't like over restored cars so their objective was get it running,legal and safe but use anything that was serviceable but don't restore paint or trim just for the sake of it :W:

I first thought,this episode was going to be boring but it was quite the opposite :Co:

They basically rebuilt and cleaned the engine but didn't repaint the block or anything.

The car had a leaky collapsed hood and broken widows and torn seats sympathetically but not over restored.

Brand new brakes,tyres etc were fitted for safety but left the bodywork with flaky paint and surface rust Shock

The bodywork was preserved by conditioning it with yes you have probably guessed an Oily Rag Clap

I for one find it hard not washing or polishing a car,it is not a money thing even if its cheap as chips car products I like to keep things looking nice but having restored a Mini a few years ago and replacing bits of trim etc to get it perfect and paying silly amounts to do so this oily rag approach does have an attraction Rolling Eyes

I am not a fan of fakery like rat look and artificially worn furniture and fake road worn guitars etc but if something has a genuine age patina maybe this "oily Rag" thing is what really classic or vintage car ownership is all about?

After all everything we replace with new or reproduction pats takes away history from a car?

I cant see why this Oily Rag approach cant be carried over with classics or just used,if a car is nice celebrate it and keep it nice but if its solid but a bit scruffy and has an age patina maybe we should celebrate that?

It shows the car has lived Thumb

For those who are still not sure what "Oily Rag" is here is a pic to wet your appetite and a link to click on to read an Oily Rag restoration story :Wky:

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Your Thoughts?

Over to you......

Has anybody here got an Oily Rag car or ever done one????

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edlithgow
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PostSubject: Re: Oily Rag Restoration Principle?   Sun Mar 31, 2013 9:05 am

Oily rag?

LOOOOXURY!

Ah'd nobbut yoosed chip fat when ah cam t't concoarse, pretty soon ah were tekkin' trowfies of them'sd yoosed the likes o' OrtoGrim.

Ah tell thee , tha can't bet yooosed chip fat fer turnin't tide o'decay and puttin a slide oonder 't Grim Reaper.
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stereosound
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PostSubject: Re: Oily Rag Restoration Principle?   Sun Mar 31, 2013 9:20 am

lm lm lm

I don't think there's anything wrong with a bit of Autoglym but there is something to be said for an honest used banger. Some cars suit the Oily Rag approach others dont Rolling Eyes

Its a little bit like Dr Martens they don't look right when there new but when well broken in and scuffed they have there own personality and some cars just don't look right restored No

A few years ago we restored a Mini,on reflection we went a little too far but there were others at shows that were so rare the owners were frightened to drive or park them anywhere

I think an old interesting car is in the driving and better to be able to use it than be scared Rolling Eyes

Vintage Cars are not my thing but id love a 50's/60's classic in Oily Rag guise Wub

A Viva HA or maybe a Ford 100e or Austin A35 would all suit the look Thumb

For the life of me though ill never ever understand the kids who deliberately strip good paint and let it rust to fake patina???

Rolling Eyes

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edlithgow
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PostSubject: Re: Oily Rag Restoration Principle?   Mon Apr 01, 2013 5:43 am

Sad thing is that, fake "It's AutoGrim Oop North" delivery aside, I actually mean it, as a perusal of the "tips" listing would show.

OK, not actual used chip fat (I'd guess not that many friers still use fat now in the UK?) but slightly rancid sunflower oil is superior for many purposes because it polymerises quicker. I try and promote this by keeping a little in a bottle on its side (more exposure to oxygen) and mixing the "aged" oil in with the new.

I'm currently using it (with aluminium) as a rust treatment, and on its own as a rubber protectant for tyres (dodgy?), radiator hoses (perceptibly softer, they'd gone crunchy on the inside) window rubbers, and I may use it to treat alternator and aircon belts that got some engine oil on them.

Previously I've tested it as an external assembly lube/thread lock (not recommended, used neat it "overlocks" the thread and made my wheels VERY difficult to remove ) and a motorcycle/bicycle chain lube (Nice lubricant but again it sets too quick. Aged in diesel it looks promisingly and stably sticky but I havn't tested that properly since I spilled it and it'll take ages to produce more.)

My aim with the rust treatment is "conservation" rather than restoration. I don't care about the cosmetics, and I'd probably find shiny car ownership a bit stressful.

OTOH I wouldn't be very comfortable leaving untreated rust, especially on a "heritage" car like the example above. I'm not sure a wipe with an oily rag is adequate, and I'd bet it'll attract dirt.

Incidentally I seem to remember reading/being told that a bit of paraffin (kerosene) in(on) the rinsing water was good for paintwork (might have been a selling tip) and I think I did that a few times when I had some.

Does that count?
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edlithgow
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PostSubject: Re: Oily Rag Restoration Principle?   Tue Apr 09, 2013 12:16 pm

If the rag had linseed oil on it that might be ok.

I've read/been told it was/is used to rust proof the inside of steel tubes in some fabric covered aircraft fuselages (as on, for example, the Tiger Moth and Auster) so if its good enough for that....dunno if this was "boiled" oil or not.
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